The Limbs and Branches of the Smith Family Tree

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  • ID: I36936 View Post-em!
  • Name: Asahel SMITH
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 7 MAR 1744 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
  • Christening: Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
  • Death: 31 OCT 1830 in Stockholm, St. Lawrence, New York
  • Burial: Stockholm, St. Lawrence, New York
  • Ancestral File #: 1XV8-M1
  • Reference Number: Taf:156+9>2.4
  • Note:
    !SOURCE: A GedCom received from Robert & Sarah Shumway, P. O. Box 27,Vidalia, LA, 71373-0027; Phone: (318) 336-5502; E-Mail: rshumway@iamerica.netreceived via E-Mail 29 mar 1998.

    !BIRTH-DEATH-SPOUSE-MARRIAGE: Information was received via WorldConnect postem note Dated: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 03:30:58 -0600 Name: Jane Curci
    Email: Wmcurci@aol.com. Jane cites the following:
    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 693021 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said Zilpha Elizabeth Wimmer was the child of Peter I Wimmer born on 23 - Mar - 1842 at Columbus IL died at American Fork UT on 6 - Jan - 1930 and his ( 2nd ) wife Mary Amelia Smith born on 2 - Feb - 1852 at Parowan UT died at Ogden UT on 26 - Mar - 1915 married on 1 - Jun - 1865

    5.The Said Mary Amelia Smith was the child of George Albert Smith born on 26 - Jun - 1817 at Potsdam NY died at Salt Lake City UT on 1 - Sep - 1875 and his ( 4st ) wife Zilpha Stark born on 3 - Jul - 1818 at Hartland NY died at Parowan UT on 19 - Sep - 1878 married on 26 - Mar - 1845

    6.The Said George Albert Smith was the child of John Smith born on 16 - Jul - 1781 at Derryfield Rockingham Co NH died at Salt Lake City UT on 22 - May - 1854 and his ( 1st ) wife Clarissa Lyman born on 27 - Jun - 1790 at Lebanon CT died at Salt Lake City UT on 14 - Feb - 1854 married on 11 - Sep - 1815

    ** Contributor: MichaelMangum1 **
    Note: SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
    In 1638, fourteen-year old Robert Smith moved from Boston, England to Boston, Massachusetts. After his marriage to Mary French, Robert bought a farm in the Topsfield Township and had ten children. (The general location of this farm is west of the commons near I-95.) A son, Samuel, married Rebecca Curtis and also bought a farm in Topsfield. They had nine children, their first son being Samuel Smith Jr. He also married, had 5 children, and lived in Topsfield.
    While living at what is now referred to as the Smith farm site, Samuel Jr. and his wife Priscilla had a son, whom they named Asael, on March 7, 1744. Asael Smith married Mary Duty and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The couple would eventually have eleven children. Their second son, Joseph (Sr.) was born at the Smith farm on July 12, 1771. In 1791, Asael and his large family moved to Ipswich for about 6 months. They then moved to Tunbridge, Vermont where their son Joseph Sr. later met his future bride, Lucy Mack.
    Concerning Asael Smith, the Prophet Joseph Smith recorded, " My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family" (HC 2:443). After Asael had read the Book of Mormon, Joseph further stated that Asael "declared that I was the very Prophet that he had long known would come in his family" (HC 2:443). He was first shown the Book of Mormon, when his son Joseph Sr. and grandson Don Carlos visited family members who were now living in St. Lawrence County, New York. Asael accepted the gospel but was too weak to be baptized. He died just a few months after his son's visit on October 30, 1830. His widow, Mary, traveled to Kirtland in 1836 to visit her extended family. She had also accepted the gospel and planned to have the Prophet baptize her. Unfortunately, she passed away just ten days after her arrival, at the age of 93.

    Asael Smith (1744)

    SELECTIONS FROM EARLY LATTER-DAY SAINT RECORDS

    Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU
    SMITH, ASAEL (1744-1830).
    Papers. Including photocopy of typescript. 9 items.
    Born at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Samuel Smith, Jr., and Priscilla Gould. A biography includes: Family background and a list of descendants of Asael and Mary Duty Smith, the grandparents of the Prophet Joseph Smith; excerpt from John Smith's journal concerning a visit of Joseph Smith, Sr., to Asael Smith, informing him and others of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon; an account of Mary Duty Smith and her family moving to Kirtland, Ohio, and her death in 1836.
    Eight genealogical family group sheets on Asael Smith and other family members.

    LIFE OF JOSEPH SMITH, BY GEORGE Q. CANNON pg. 26
    The paternal grandfather of the Prophet was Asael Smith, a man of the strongest religious convictions, and yet a man whose broad humanitarian views were repugnant to many of the sectarians of the day. Upon one occasion, before the Prophet's birth, Asael Smith had a premonition that one of his descendants should be a great teacher and leader of men. To quote his words, as they are remembered and recorded by one who knew and heard him speak: "It has been borne in upon my soul that one of my descendants will promulgate a work to revolutionize the world of religious faith."

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 20
    Asael Smith, father of the Patriarch Joseph Smith, was born in Topsfield, Essex County, Mass. March 7, 1744. He was the second and youngest son of Samuel Smith Jr. His mother died September 25th, 1744, when he was less than six months old, and he declares in his address to his children that he never knew the tender care which a mother should give, and a child receive. The greater part of his life was spent in Topsfield. He married in Topsfield, Feb. 12, 1767, Mary Duty, daughter of Moses and Mary Duty of Rowley. Mary was born in Rowley. Her mother's maiden name was Palmer. About the year 1772, Asael moved to Windham, New Hampshire, where the parents of his wife were then living. From there he moved to Dumbarton, then to Derryfield.

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 28
    (Signed) Asael Smith.

    Asael was devotedly attached to his wife, his life-long companion, who survived him. The latter years of his life were spent at the home of his son Silas in Stockholm, St. Lawrence County, New York, where he died, October 31, 1830, over 86 years of age. In stature he was tall, with a well proportioned body, and notwithstanding the accident which occurred in his early youth, he could handle two ordinary men with ease. The following items of interest are taken from the Documentary History of the Church: The Prophet writes under date of May 16, 1836: "My cousin, Elias Smith, arrived from St. Lawrence County, New York, with the information that his father and family, and Uncle Silas and family, were on their way to Kirtland, and that my grandmother (Mary Duty Smith) was at Fairport."

    May 17.-I went in company with my brother Hyrum, in a carriage to Fairport, and brought home my grandmother, Mary Smith, aged ninety-three years. She hadnot been baptized, on account of the opposition of Jesse Smith, her eldest son,who has always been an enemy to the work. She had come five hundred miles to see her children, and knew all of us she had ever seen. She was much pleased at being introduced to her great-grandchildren, and expressed much pleasure and gratification on seeing me.

    My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family, and my grandfather was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather Asael died in East Stockholm, St. Lawrence County, New York, after having the Book of Mormon, and (he) read it nearly through; and he declared that I was the very prophet that he had long known would come in his family.

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 28- 29
    On the 18th, my Uncle Silas Smith and family arrived from the east. My father, three of his brothers, and their mother, met the first time for many years. It was a happy day, for we had long prayed to see our grandmother and uncles in the Church. On May 27, after a few days visit with her children, which she enjoyed extremely well, my grandmother fell asleep without sickness, pain or regret. She breathed her last about sunset, and was buried in the burial ground near the temple, after funeral address had been delivered by Sidney Rigdon. She had buried one daughter, Sarah; two sons, Stephen and Samuel and her husband, who had kept a record, there were one hundred and ten children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. My uncle Stephen, and aunt Sarah, were buried side by side in the burial grounds in Royalton, Windsor County, Vermont. Stephen died July 25, 1802, aged seventeen years, three months and eleven days. Both Asael Smith and his wife Mary Duty Smith accepted in full the mission of their grandson, Joseph, and rejoiced greatly in the restoration of the Gospel before their departure from mortal life. The children of Asael and Mary Duty Smith were:

    J.F. Smith Jr., Life of Joseph Fielding Smith, p. 33
    Asael Smith (1744-1830), Joseph Smith Sr.'s father, might be considered the first generation Mormon, although he did not actually join the Church, having died just six months after it was organized. But it is in Asael that the several lines of leading families of Smith in the Church converge. He had several sons and daughters. Four sons, Joseph, Asael, Silas and John, joined the Church; two sons, Samuel and Stephen, and one daughter, Sarah Sanford, died before the Church was restored. One son, Jesse, his eldest child, was 62 years old when the Church was restored, and was much opposed to it. In the family history, there is no mention of Asael's three other daughters, Priscilla Waller, Mary Pierce, and Susannah Smith, having joined the Church.

    J.F. Smith Jr., Life of Joseph Fielding Smith, p. 34
    Asael Smith was not the only American revolutionist who felt a conviction that the true church would one day be restored to the earth. In 1820, the year Asael's grandson, Joseph the Prophet, received his first vision, Thomas Jefferson, author of the American Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States, in denouncing the sectarian priests, declared, "The genuine and simple religion of Jesus will one day be restored, such as it was preached and practiced by Himself. Very soon after His death it became muffled up in mysteries, and has been ever since kept in concealment from the vulgar eye.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 25
    In Dow's history of Topsfield, Asael Smith is listed as a cooper by trade. This same history tells of a sawmill being set up in 1671 and a provision for damages to be paid the townspeople for any harm done to their meadows by the mill. The record shows that damages were received by a Thomas Dorman and sons who erected a house in 1690 within a few rods of the mill. "This house was occupied for several years during the latter part of the eighteenth century by Asael Smith, and here, on July 12, 1771, his son Joseph was born, who was the father of the celebrated Joseph Smith, founder of Mormonism in this country." [Note 3. Dow, op. cit., pp. 335, 363.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 27
    [page 27] It has been said that the paternal grandfather of the Prophet was a man of the strongest religious convictions, and yet a man whose broad humanitarian views were repugnant to many of the sectarians of the day. [Note 1. George Q. Cannon,

    Life of Joseph Smith, the Prophet (Salt Lake City: Juvenile Instructor, 1888), p. 32.] Upon one occasion, before the Prophet's birth, Asael Smith had a premonition that one of his descendants should be a great teacher and leader of men. To quote his words, "as they are remembered and recorded by one who knew him and heard him speak: `It has been borne in upon my soul that one of my descendants will promulgate a work to revolutionize the world of religious faith.'" [Note 2. Ibid.]

    Asael Smith was gifted in writing, and left two documents that show his soundness of understanding, clearness in intellect, and refinement of nature.

    One of these documents was a letter to Mr. Jacob Town of Topsfield and was written after he had removed to Turnbridge, Vermont, dated January 14, 1796. From this we learn of his activities at this time.

    . . . . I have set me up a house since Mr. Willes was here and expect to remove into it next spring and to begin again on an entire new farm, and my son, Joseph, will live on the old farm (if this that has been but four years occupied can be called old), and carry it on at the halves, which half I hope will nearly furnish my family with food, whilst I, with my four youngest sons, shall endeavor to bring to another farm, etc. [Note 3. Dow, op. cit., XXX, 126.]

    His belief in God and the government of his day is indicated in this quotation:
    For my part, I am so willing to trust the government of the world in the hands of the Supreme Ruler of universal nature, that I do not at present wish to try to wrest it out of His hands, and I have so much confidence in His abilities to teach our senators wisdom, that I do not think it worthwhile for me to interpose, from the little stock of knowledge that He has favored me with, in the affair [page 28] either one way or the other. He has conducted us through a glorious Revolution and has brought us into the promised land of peace and liberty, and I believe that He is about to bring all the world into the same beatitude in His own time and way; which, although, His ways may appear never so inconsistent to our blind reason, yet may be perfectly consistent with His designs. [Note 1. Ibid., p. 127-28.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 28
    We learn of his philosophy in this letter by the following story:
    . . . .I have taken up with the eleventh commandment, that the negro taught to the minister, which was thus--
    The minister asked the negro how many commandments there were, his answer was `elebon, sir!' `Aye!'replied the other, `what is the eleventh? That is one I never heard of.' `The eleventh commandment, sir, is MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS.'
    So I choose to do, and give myself but little concern about what passes in the political world. [Note 2. Ibid., p. 128.]

    On the second page of this letter, written along the margin, appear the following statement: "I expect Joseph will be married in a few days." [Note 3. Ibid., p. 129.]

    The second document is an address to his family thirty years before he passed away. It was his intention not to have it read until after his death, but its existence became known and it was read. The following information was taken from this address, which reveals the love he had for his family.

    He first addressed his wife by expressing gratitude for her kindness and faithfulness. He reminded her that if she should marry again, she remember what he had undergone as a result of having a stepmother, and told her not to estrange her husband from his own children or kindred.

    Instructing his children on the immortality of their souls, he said:

    Trifle not in this point; the soul is immortal; you have to deal with an infinite Majesty; you go upon life and death; therefore in this point be serious. Do all to God in a serious manner; when you think of Him, speak of Him, pray to Him, or in any way, make your addresses to His great Majesty, be in good earnest.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 29
    [page 29] Trifle not with His name nor with His attributes, nor call Him to witness to anything but is absolute truth;. . . .and as to religion, I would not wish to point any particular form to you; but first I would wish you to search the Scriptures and consult sound reason and see if they (which I take to be two witnesses that stand by the God of the whole earth) are not sufficient to evince to you that religion is a necessary theme. Then I would wish you to study the nature of religion, and see whether it consists in outward formalities, or in the hidden man of the heart; whether you can by outward forms, rites and ordinances, save yourselves, or whether there is a necessity of your having help from any other hand than your own. [Note 1. Dow, op. cit., VIII, 92.]
    He continued by instructing them of the mission of the Savior and labored the point that God had given two witnesses for them -- scripture and reason -- that they may know the truth. Then "do all to your God as to your father, for His love is ten thousand times greater towards you than ever any earthly father's could be to his offspring." [Note 2. Ibid., p. 93.]
    He continued his admonitions:
    Do not talk and make noise to get the name of forward men, but do the thing and do it in a way that is fair and honest, which you can live and die by and rise and reign by; therefore, my children, do more than you talk of, in point of religion; satisfy your own conscience in what you do; all men you shall never satisfy, nay, some will not be satisfied though they be converted.
    As for your calling -- any honest calling will honor you if you honor that. It is better to be a rich cobbler than a poor merchant; a rich farmer than a poor preacher; and never be discouraged though sometimes your schemes should not succeed according to your wishes.. . . .
    As to your Company -- abandon all infectious, self-serving companions, when once you have found them false, trust them no more. . . .
    As to your Marriage -- I do not think it worthwhile to say much about them, for I believe God hath created the persons for each other and that nature will find its own.
    But for your Children -- Make it your chiefest work to bring them up in the ways of virtue that they may be useful in their generation. Give them if possible, a good education; if nature [page 30] hath made no difference do you make none in your affections, countenances nor portions; partiality this way begets envy, hatred, strife and contention. [Note 1. Ibid., p. 94.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 30
    Joseph's father continued in his address to counsel his children t visit one another and help each other in every way they could. He encouraged them to "comfort, counsel, relieve, succor, help, and admonish one another, and while your mother lives, meet her, if possible, once every year.
    His closing advice was for them to be grateful for the land of liberty and remain loyal to its objectives. [Note 3. Ibid.] This reveals a man of noble character and child-like humility. His faith and trust in God, in the American Government, in the family unit, is most admirable. Such ideals and attitudes are most significant in the shaping of the personality of his children.
    Throughout Joseph's life he reflected the ideals and attitudes of his father that had played an important part in shaping his personality. He was the third child and second son of a family of eleven children, four girls and seven boys. Joseph's oldest brother, Jesse, and third oldest sister, Susannah, did not take to the truths of the Gospel when they were offered to them; all other members of Asael's family did. [Note 4. DHC, IV, 190.] Joseph, and three of his brothers, Asael, Jr., Silas, and John, became active in the Church and prominent in its counsels.
    As previously stated, Asael and his family moved to northern New Hampshire and then to Turnbridge, Vermont. He was accompanied by Joseph, who assisted in clearing land for a farm, which he assumed the responsibility [page 31] of operating on the "half-share" system four years later. His experience in farming, marrying, and rearing a family, follow in the next chapter.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 31
    These formative influences of the home, the religion, the education, the community, the progenitors, and the friends, all helped to shape the personality and character of Joseph Smith, Sr., a humble, sincere, honorable, hardworking, individualistic man, whose "HOUSE WAS BUILT UPON A ROCK."
    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 70
    It appears that in the fall of 1828, Father Smith had written a letter to his father, Asael Smith, "informing him of some of the visions the youthful Prophet had received." [Note 2. DHC., I, 284.] In August, 1830, he and his youngest son, Don Carlos, set out on a mission to visit his father at Portsdam, New York. The particulars of this mission will be given in Chapter VII of this work.

    History of the Church, Vol.2, Ch.31, p.443 My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family, and my grandmother was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather Asael died in East Stockholm, St. Lawrence county, New York, after having received the Book of Mormon, and read it nearly through; and he declared that I was the very Prophet that he had long known would come in his family.

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 Asael Smith, second son of the above Samuel Smith (II), was born 7th of March, 1744. His early life was spent in Topsfield, and at twenty-three he married Mary Duty, of Windham, New Hampshire, in which place he lived for some time, thence moving successively to Dunbarton, and Manchester in the same state. During the American Revolution he served, though with less distinction than his father, in the American army.
    On the death of his father, Samuel Smith (II), Asael returned to the old homestead at Topsfield, which he had inherited. At Topsfield, Asael was made to feel the pressure of sectarian intolerance. It is evident that he had strong inclination himself toward that system of doctrine known as universalism--the belief that all souls will finally be saved, that good will finally triumph, universally and permanently.

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 He was a man of strong convictions in religion, courageous, outspoken, but tolerant withal; and held to the view, not so popular then as it afterwards became, that men should be free to worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences. These views brought upon him the displeasure of the severely orthodox, who, at that time were swayed by the spirit that regarded toleration with the suspicion, so well expressed in the following quartrain:
    "Let men of God in courts and churches watch
    O'er such as do a Toleration hatch,
    Lest that ill egg bring forth a cockatrice
    To poison all in heresy and vice."

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 - p.6 This long had been the spirit dominant in New England, and therefore when Asael Smith made free to express his unorthodox opinions, and further emphasized these by giving shelter in his home to a despised and persecuted Quaker, it brought such displeasure of the community upon him that he resolved to leave Topsfield, the home of his fathers, and seek a more congenial society. He went first to northern New Hampshire, thence to Tunbridge, Vermont, where with the aid of his sons he cleared a large farm of virgin forest. In the later years of his life he made his home with his son Silas at Stockholm, St. Lawrence county, New York, where he died October 31st, 1830, in his eighty-sixth year.
    It is necessary to deal further with the character of this ancestor of the Prophet, since he is much relied upon by the "hallucination theorists" to prove the physical and mental defects which they feign Joseph Smith, the Prophet, inherited from his forefathers. It has been said that Asael had a physical deformity, that one shoulder was higher than the other. Nehemiah Cleveland, in an address at Topsfield on the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of the town's incorporation, alluded to this supposed defect by saying: "This man, like `Ammon's great son, one shoulder had too high,' and hence usually bore the significant and complimentary (!) designation of "Crooked Neck Smith'." One may easily discern the bias of the speaker, as he adds: "He was so free in his opinions on religious subjects, that some regarded his sentiments as more distorted than his neck." The facts in relation to this physical "deformity" are, that while a small child Asael's neck was severely burned, the cords contracted, drawing the neck to one side, and rendering it stiff. This misfortune the malice of those whom he offended by the freedom of his religious opinions seized upon as an "abnormality" that later was pressed into service to account for supposed mental abnormalities in his grandson, founder of the Church of the Latter-day Saints. As to the "distortion" of Asael's mind, two documents of his exist which reflect the quality of his mind so clearly, that the reader will need no other evidence to establish the soundness of his understanding, the clearness of his intellect, or the refinement of his nature, than their perusal.

    Jesse Nathaniel Smith, Journal (1953), pg. 2
    They were hardy, long-lived New Englanders, with unyielding, puritanical ideas. Both my grandfathers were engaged in the Revolutionary War, Grandfather Aikens being under General Washington at the time the Marquis de LaRayette first visited the camp of the Americans. My grandfather Asahel Smith was a somewhat eccentric visionary man; he predicted that something would come forth in his family which would transmit his name in honor to posterity. When near his death, his son Joseph, the father of Joseph the Prophet, visited him at my father's house, bringing with him the Book of Mormon and the glad tidings of the Gospel. Grandfather received with gladness that which his son Joseph communicated, and remarked that he had always expected that something would appear to make known the true Gospel. This was the year the Church was organized, 1830. Grandfather Smith died Oct. 31, 1830, over 86 years old.

    JD, Vol.5, Pg.103, George Albert Smith, August 2, 1857
    My grandfather, Asahel Smith, heard of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and he said it was true, for he knew that something would turn up in his family that would revolutionize the world. The news came to us in 1828: we then lived in New York. The four brothers were there, Asahel, Silas, Jesse, and John; the old man, my grandfather, living with them.
    We received the news that some place had been discovered containing plates of gold. The old man, as I remarked, said that it was true, although his oldest son felt disposed to ridicule it. He lived till the Book of Mormon was brought to him, and died when he had read it about half through, being 87 years of age.

    SITES TO SEE? Commons - After passing the Topsfield fair grounds on US-1, continue for half a mile and turn left at the signal onto High Street. Continue another half mile and you will reach the commons. Notice the large white Congregational Church located here. Some of the Prophet's ancestors were baptized at this site including Asael and Joseph Smith Sr. The existing building was constructed in the 1840s and is not the original church.
    ? Pine Grove Cemetery - Many members of the Smith family are buried in this cemetery including Robert Smith, Samuel and his wife Rebecca, and Samuel Smith Jr. and his wife Priscilla. The exact locations of the graves are unknown and a memorial marker to the Smith family was erected under the supervision of George A. Smith in 1873. The cemetery is located about one-half mile from the commons. After stopping at the commons, turn right and go north on I-95 (which is also 97 N.). Bear left at the fork in the road and stay on 97 N. The entrance to the cemetery will be on your left. As you enter the cemetery, the Smith family marker is located at your far left, very close to both a rock wall and the road (97 N.).
    ? Smith Farmhouse Site - This was once the home site of Samuel, Samuel Jr., and the birth site of Asael Smith and Joseph Smith Sr. Though the original home is no longer standing, the Smith well still exists in the backyard of this home. To see the farm site after leaving the cemetery, make a right turn onto 97 N. Take the first left (at the fork) onto Ipswich. Go about one-half mile and turn left on North Street. Go one-tenth mile and turn left onto Boardman Street (stay on the right side of the forked road). Go to the end of the street and the home will be the last one on your left (Walker Road begins on your right). The home is privately owned and not available for tours.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: MichaelMangum1 **
    Note: SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
    In 1638, fourteen-year old Robert Smith moved from Boston, England to Boston, Massachusetts. After his marriage to Mary French, Robert bought a farm in the Topsfield Township and had ten children. (The general location of this farm is west of the commons near I-95.) A son, Samuel, married Rebecca Curtis and also bought a farm in Topsfield. They had nine children, their first son being Samuel Smith Jr. He also married, had 5 children, and lived in Topsfield.
    While living at what is now referred to as the Smith farm site, Samuel Jr. and his wife Priscilla had a son, whom they named Asael, on March 7, 1744. Asael Smith married Mary Duty and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The couple would eventually have eleven children. Their second son, Joseph (Sr.) was born at the Smith farm on July 12, 1771. In 1791, Asael and his large family moved to Ipswich for about 6 months. They then moved to Tunbridge, Vermont where their son Joseph Sr. later met his future bride, Lucy Mack.
    Concerning Asael Smith, the Prophet Joseph Smith recorded, " My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family" (HC 2:443). After Asael had read the Book of Mormon, Joseph further stated that Asael "declared that I was the very Prophet that he had long known would come in his family" (HC 2:443). He was first shown the Book of Mormon, when his son Joseph Sr. and grandson Don Carlos visited family members who were now living in St. Lawrence County, New York. Asael accepted the gospel but was too weak to be baptized. He died just a few months after his son's visit on October 30, 1830. His widow, Mary, traveled to Kirtland in 1836 to visit her extended family. She had also accepted the gospel and planned to have the Prophet baptize her. Unfortunately, she passed away just ten days after her arrival, at the age of 93.

    Asael Smith (1744)

    SELECTIONS FROM EARLY LATTER-DAY SAINT RECORDS

    Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU
    SMITH, ASAEL (1744-1830).
    Papers. Including photocopy of typescript. 9 items.
    Born at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Samuel Smith, Jr., and Priscilla Gould. A biography includes: Family background and a list of descendants of Asael and Mary Duty Smith, the grandparents of the Prophet Joseph Smith; excerpt from John Smith's journal concerning a visit of Joseph Smith, Sr., to Asael Smith, informing him and others of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon; an account of Mary Duty Smith and her family moving to Kirtland, Ohio, and her death in 1836.
    Eight genealogical family group sheets on Asael Smith and other family members.

    LIFE OF JOSEPH SMITH, BY GEORGE Q. CANNON pg. 26
    The paternal grandfather of the Prophet was Asael Smith, a man of the strongest religious convictions, and yet a man whose broad humanitarian views were repugnant to many of the sectarians of the day. Upon one occasion, before the Prophet's birth, Asael Smith had a premonition that one of his descendants should be a great teacher and leader of men. To quote his words, as they are remembered and recorded by one who knew and heard him speak: "It has been borne in upon my soul that one of my descendants will promulgate a work to revolutionize the world of religious faith."

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 20
    Asael Smith, father of the Patriarch Joseph Smith, was born in Topsfield, Essex County, Mass. March 7, 1744. He was the second and youngest son of Samuel Smith Jr. His mother died September 25th, 1744, when he was less than six months old, and he declares in his address to his children that he never knew the tender care which a mother should give, and a child receive. The greater part of his life was spent in Topsfield. He married in Topsfield, Feb. 12, 1767, Mary Duty, daughter of Moses and Mary Duty of Rowley. Mary was born in Rowley. Her mother's maiden name was Palmer. About the year 1772, Asael moved to Windham, New Hampshire, where the parents of his wife were then living. From there he moved to Dumbarton, then to Derryfield.

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 28
    (Signed) Asael Smith.

    Asael was devotedly attached to his wife, his life-long companion, who survived him. The latter years of his life were spent at the home of his son Silas in Stockholm, St. Lawrence County, New York, where he died, October 31, 1830, over 86 years of age. In stature he was tall, with a well proportioned body, and notwithstanding the accident which occurred in his early youth, he could handle two ordinary men with ease. The following items of interest are taken from the Documentary History of the Church: The Prophet writes under date of May 16, 1836: "My cousin, Elias Smith, arrived from St. Lawrence County, New York, with the information that his father and family, and Uncle Silas and family, were on their way to Kirtland, and that my grandmother (Mary Duty Smith) was at Fairport."

    May 17.-I went in company with my brother Hyrum, in a carriage to Fairport, and brought home my grandmother, Mary Smith, aged ninety-three years. She hadnot been baptized, on account of the opposition of Jesse Smith, her eldest son,who has always been an enemy to the work. She had come five hundred miles to see her children, and knew all of us she had ever seen. She was much pleased at being introduced to her great-grandchildren, and expressed much pleasure and gratification on seeing me.

    My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family, and my grandfather was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather Asael died in East Stockholm, St. Lawrence County, New York, after having the Book of Mormon, and (he) read it nearly through; and he declared that I was the very prophet that he had long known would come in his family.

    Life of Joseph F. Smith, by Joseph Fielding Smith pg. 28- 29
    On the 18th, my Uncle Silas Smith and family arrived from the east. My father, three of his brothers, and their mother, met the first time for many years. It was a happy day, for we had long prayed to see our grandmother and uncles in the Church. On May 27, after a few days visit with her children, which she enjoyed extremely well, my grandmother fell asleep without sickness, pain or regret. She breathed her last about sunset, and was buried in the burial ground near the temple, after funeral address had been delivered by Sidney Rigdon. She had buried one daughter, Sarah; two sons, Stephen and Samuel and her husband, who had kept a record, there were one hundred and ten children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. My uncle Stephen, and aunt Sarah, were buried side by side in the burial grounds in Royalton, Windsor County, Vermont. Stephen died July 25, 1802, aged seventeen years, three months and eleven days. Both Asael Smith and his wife Mary Duty Smith accepted in full the mission of their grandson, Joseph, and rejoiced greatly in the restoration of the Gospel before their departure from mortal life. The children of Asael and Mary Duty Smith were:

    J.F. Smith Jr., Life of Joseph Fielding Smith, p. 33
    Asael Smith (1744-1830), Joseph Smith Sr.'s father, might be considered the first generation Mormon, although he did not actually join the Church, having died just six months after it was organized. But it is in Asael that the several lines of leading families of Smith in the Church converge. He had several sons and daughters. Four sons, Joseph, Asael, Silas and John, joined the Church; two sons, Samuel and Stephen, and one daughter, Sarah Sanford, died before the Church was restored. One son, Jesse, his eldest child, was 62 years old when the Church was restored, and was much opposed to it. In the family history, there is no mention of Asael's three other daughters, Priscilla Waller, Mary Pierce, and Susannah Smith, having joined the Church.

    J.F. Smith Jr., Life of Joseph Fielding Smith, p. 34
    Asael Smith was not the only American revolutionist who felt a conviction that the true church would one day be restored to the earth. In 1820, the year Asael's grandson, Joseph the Prophet, received his first vision, Thomas Jefferson, author of the American Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States, in denouncing the sectarian priests, declared, "The genuine and simple religion of Jesus will one day be restored, such as it was preached and practiced by Himself. Very soon after His death it became muffled up in mysteries, and has been ever since kept in concealment from the vulgar eye.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 25
    In Dow's history of Topsfield, Asael Smith is listed as a cooper by trade. This same history tells of a sawmill being set up in 1671 and a provision for damages to be paid the townspeople for any harm done to their meadows by the mill. The record shows that damages were received by a Thomas Dorman and sons who erected a house in 1690 within a few rods of the mill. "This house was occupied for several years during the latter part of the eighteenth century by Asael Smith, and here, on July 12, 1771, his son Joseph was born, who was the father of the celebrated Joseph Smith, founder of Mormonism in this country." [Note 3. Dow, op. cit., pp. 335, 363.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 27
    [page 27] It has been said that the paternal grandfather of the Prophet was a man of the strongest religious convictions, and yet a man whose broad humanitarian views were repugnant to many of the sectarians of the day. [Note 1. George Q. Cannon,

    Life of Joseph Smith, the Prophet (Salt Lake City: Juvenile Instructor, 1888), p. 32.] Upon one occasion, before the Prophet's birth, Asael Smith had a premonition that one of his descendants should be a great teacher and leader of men. To quote his words, "as they are remembered and recorded by one who knew him and heard him speak: `It has been borne in upon my soul that one of my descendants will promulgate a work to revolutionize the world of religious faith.'" [Note 2. Ibid.]

    Asael Smith was gifted in writing, and left two documents that show his soundness of understanding, clearness in intellect, and refinement of nature.

    One of these documents was a letter to Mr. Jacob Town of Topsfield and was written after he had removed to Turnbridge, Vermont, dated January 14, 1796. From this we learn of his activities at this time.

    . . . . I have set me up a house since Mr. Willes was here and expect to remove into it next spring and to begin again on an entire new farm, and my son, Joseph, will live on the old farm (if this that has been but four years occupied can be called old), and carry it on at the halves, which half I hope will nearly furnish my family with food, whilst I, with my four youngest sons, shall endeavor to bring to another farm, etc. [Note 3. Dow, op. cit., XXX, 126.]

    His belief in God and the government of his day is indicated in this quotation:
    For my part, I am so willing to trust the government of the world in the hands of the Supreme Ruler of universal nature, that I do not at present wish to try to wrest it out of His hands, and I have so much confidence in His abilities to teach our senators wisdom, that I do not think it worthwhile for me to interpose, from the little stock of knowledge that He has favored me with, in the affair [page 28] either one way or the other. He has conducted us through a glorious Revolution and has brought us into the promised land of peace and liberty, and I believe that He is about to bring all the world into the same beatitude in His own time and way; which, although, His ways may appear never so inconsistent to our blind reason, yet may be perfectly consistent with His designs. [Note 1. Ibid., p. 127-28.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 28
    We learn of his philosophy in this letter by the following story:
    . . . .I have taken up with the eleventh commandment, that the negro taught to the minister, which was thus--
    The minister asked the negro how many commandments there were, his answer was `elebon, sir!' `Aye!'replied the other, `what is the eleventh? That is one I never heard of.' `The eleventh commandment, sir, is MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS.'
    So I choose to do, and give myself but little concern about what passes in the political world. [Note 2. Ibid., p. 128.]

    On the second page of this letter, written along the margin, appear the following statement: "I expect Joseph will be married in a few days." [Note 3. Ibid., p. 129.]

    The second document is an address to his family thirty years before he passed away. It was his intention not to have it read until after his death, but its existence became known and it was read. The following information was taken from this address, which reveals the love he had for his family.

    He first addressed his wife by expressing gratitude for her kindness and faithfulness. He reminded her that if she should marry again, she remember what he had undergone as a result of having a stepmother, and told her not to estrange her husband from his own children or kindred.

    Instructing his children on the immortality of their souls, he said:

    Trifle not in this point; the soul is immortal; you have to deal with an infinite Majesty; you go upon life and death; therefore in this point be serious. Do all to God in a serious manner; when you think of Him, speak of Him, pray to Him, or in any way, make your addresses to His great Majesty, be in good earnest.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 29
    [page 29] Trifle not with His name nor with His attributes, nor call Him to witness to anything but is absolute truth;. . . .and as to religion, I would not wish to point any particular form to you; but first I would wish you to search the Scriptures and consult sound reason and see if they (which I take to be two witnesses that stand by the God of the whole earth) are not sufficient to evince to you that religion is a necessary theme. Then I would wish you to study the nature of religion, and see whether it consists in outward formalities, or in the hidden man of the heart; whether you can by outward forms, rites and ordinances, save yourselves, or whether there is a necessity of your having help from any other hand than your own. [Note 1. Dow, op. cit., VIII, 92.]
    He continued by instructing them of the mission of the Savior and labored the point that God had given two witnesses for them -- scripture and reason -- that they may know the truth. Then "do all to your God as to your father, for His love is ten thousand times greater towards you than ever any earthly father's could be to his offspring." [Note 2. Ibid., p. 93.]
    He continued his admonitions:
    Do not talk and make noise to get the name of forward men, but do the thing and do it in a way that is fair and honest, which you can live and die by and rise and reign by; therefore, my children, do more than you talk of, in point of religion; satisfy your own conscience in what you do; all men you shall never satisfy, nay, some will not be satisfied though they be converted.
    As for your calling -- any honest calling will honor you if you honor that. It is better to be a rich cobbler than a poor merchant; a rich farmer than a poor preacher; and never be discouraged though sometimes your schemes should not succeed according to your wishes.. . . .
    As to your Company -- abandon all infectious, self-serving companions, when once you have found them false, trust them no more. . . .
    As to your Marriage -- I do not think it worthwhile to say much about them, for I believe God hath created the persons for each other and that nature will find its own.
    But for your Children -- Make it your chiefest work to bring them up in the ways of virtue that they may be useful in their generation. Give them if possible, a good education; if nature [page 30] hath made no difference do you make none in your affections, countenances nor portions; partiality this way begets envy, hatred, strife and contention. [Note 1. Ibid., p. 94.]

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 30
    Joseph's father continued in his address to counsel his children t visit one another and help each other in every way they could. He encouraged them to "comfort, counsel, relieve, succor, help, and admonish one another, and while your mother lives, meet her, if possible, once every year.
    His closing advice was for them to be grateful for the land of liberty and remain loyal to its objectives. [Note 3. Ibid.] This reveals a man of noble character and child-like humility. His faith and trust in God, in the American Government, in the family unit, is most admirable. Such ideals and attitudes are most significant in the shaping of the personality of his children.
    Throughout Joseph's life he reflected the ideals and attitudes of his father that had played an important part in shaping his personality. He was the third child and second son of a family of eleven children, four girls and seven boys. Joseph's oldest brother, Jesse, and third oldest sister, Susannah, did not take to the truths of the Gospel when they were offered to them; all other members of Asael's family did. [Note 4. DHC, IV, 190.] Joseph, and three of his brothers, Asael, Jr., Silas, and John, became active in the Church and prominent in its counsels.
    As previously stated, Asael and his family moved to northern New Hampshire and then to Turnbridge, Vermont. He was accompanied by Joseph, who assisted in clearing land for a farm, which he assumed the responsibility [page 31] of operating on the "half-share" system four years later. His experience in farming, marrying, and rearing a family, follow in the next chapter.

    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 31
    These formative influences of the home, the religion, the education, the community, the progenitors, and the friends, all helped to shape the personality and character of Joseph Smith, Sr., a humble, sincere, honorable, hardworking, individualistic man, whose "HOUSE WAS BUILT UPON A ROCK."
    Joseph Smith, Sr., biog by E. Skinner, thesis, BYU, 1958, pg. 70
    It appears that in the fall of 1828, Father Smith had written a letter to his father, Asael Smith, "informing him of some of the visions the youthful Prophet had received." [Note 2. DHC., I, 284.] In August, 1830, he and his youngest son, Don Carlos, set out on a mission to visit his father at Portsdam, New York. The particulars of this mission will be given in Chapter VII of this work.

    History of the Church, Vol.2, Ch.31, p.443 My grandfather, Asael Smith, long ago predicted that there would be a prophet raised up in his family, and my grandmother was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather Asael died in East Stockholm, St. Lawrence county, New York, after having received the Book of Mormon, and read it nearly through; and he declared that I was the very Prophet that he had long known would come in his family.

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 Asael Smith, second son of the above Samuel Smith (II), was born 7th of March, 1744. His early life was spent in Topsfield, and at twenty-three he married Mary Duty, of Windham, New Hampshire, in which place he lived for some time, thence moving successively to Dunbarton, and Manchester in the same state. During the American Revolution he served, though with less distinction than his father, in the American army.
    On the death of his father, Samuel Smith (II), Asael returned to the old homestead at Topsfield, which he had inherited. At Topsfield, Asael was made to feel the pressure of sectarian intolerance. It is evident that he had strong inclination himself toward that system of doctrine known as universalism--the belief that all souls will finally be saved, that good will finally triumph, universally and permanently.

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 He was a man of strong convictions in religion, courageous, outspoken, but tolerant withal; and held to the view, not so popular then as it afterwards became, that men should be free to worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences. These views brought upon him the displeasure of the severely orthodox, who, at that time were swayed by the spirit that regarded toleration with the suspicion, so well expressed in the following quartrain:
    "Let men of God in courts and churches watch
    O'er such as do a Toleration hatch,
    Lest that ill egg bring forth a cockatrice
    To poison all in heresy and vice."

    B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 - p.6 This long had been the spirit dominant in New England, and therefore when Asael Smith made free to express his unorthodox opinions, and further emphasized these by giving shelter in his home to a despised and persecuted Quaker, it brought such displeasure of the community upon him that he resolved to leave Topsfield, the home of his fathers, and seek a more congenial society. He went first to northern New Hampshire, thence to Tunbridge, Vermont, where with the aid of his sons he cleared a large farm of virgin forest. In the later years of his life he made his home with his son Silas at Stockholm, St. Lawrence county, New York, where he died October 31st, 1830, in his eighty-sixth year.
    It is necessary to deal further with the character of this ancestor of the Prophet, since he is much relied upon by the "hallucination theorists" to prove the physical and mental defects which they feign Joseph Smith, the Prophet, inherited from his forefathers. It has been said that Asael had a physical deformity, that one shoulder was higher than the other. Nehemiah Cleveland, in an address at Topsfield on the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of the town's incorporation, alluded to this supposed defect by saying: "This man, like `Ammon's great son, one shoulder had too high,' and hence usually bore the significant and complimentary (!) designation of "Crooked Neck Smith'." One may easily discern the bias of the speaker, as he adds: "He was so free in his opinions on religious subjects, that some regarded his sentiments as more distorted than his neck." The facts in relation to this physical "deformity" are, that while a small child Asael's neck was severely burned, the cords contracted, drawing the neck to one side, and rendering it stiff. This misfortune the malice of those whom he offended by the freedom of his religious opinions seized upon as an "abnormality" that later was pressed into service to account for supposed mental abnormalities in his grandson, founder of the Church of the Latter-day Saints. As to the "distortion" of Asael's mind, two documents of his exist which reflect the quality of his mind so clearly, that the reader will need no other evidence to establish the soundness of his understanding, the clearness of his intellect, or the refinement of his nature, than their perusal.

    Jesse Nathaniel Smith, Journal (1953), pg. 2
    They were hardy, long-lived New Englanders, with unyielding, puritanical ideas. Both my grandfathers were engaged in the Revolutionary War, Grandfather Aikens being under General Washington at the time the Marquis de LaRayette first visited the camp of the Americans. My grandfather Asahel Smith was a somewhat eccentric visionary man; he predicted that something would come forth in his family which would transmit his name in honor to posterity. When near his death, his son Joseph, the father of Joseph the Prophet, visited him at my father's house, bringing with him the Book of Mormon and the glad tidings of the Gospel. Grandfather received with gladness that which his son Joseph communicated, and remarked that he had always expected that something would appear to make known the true Gospel. This was the year the Church was organized, 1830. Grandfather Smith died Oct. 31, 1830, over 86 years old.

    JD, Vol.5, Pg.103, George Albert Smith, August 2, 1857
    My grandfather, Asahel Smith, heard of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and he said it was true, for he knew that something would turn up in his family that would revolutionize the world. The news came to us in 1828: we then lived in New York. The four brothers were there, Asahel, Silas, Jesse, and John; the old man, my grandfather, living with them.
    We received the news that some place had been discovered containing plates of gold. The old man, as I remarked, said that it was true, although his oldest son felt disposed to ridicule it. He lived till the Book of Mormon was brought to him, and died when he had read it about half through, being 87 years of age.

    SITES TO SEE? Commons - After passing the Topsfield fair grounds on US-1, continue for half a mile and turn left at the signal onto High Street. Continue another half mile and you will reach the commons. Notice the large white Congregational Church located here. Some of the Prophet's ancestors were baptized at this site including Asael and Joseph Smith Sr. The existing building was constructed in the 1840s and is not the original church.
    ? Pine Grove Cemetery - Many members of the Smith family are buried in this cemetery including Robert Smith, Samuel and his wife Rebecca, and Samuel Smith Jr. and his wife Priscilla. The exact locations of the graves are unknown and a memorial marker to the Smith family was erected under the supervision of George A. Smith in 1873. The cemetery is located about one-half mile from the commons. After stopping at the commons, turn right and go north on I-95 (which is also 97 N.). Bear left at the fork in the road and stay on 97 N. The entrance to the cemetery will be on your left. As you enter the cemetery, the Smith family marker is located at your far left, very close to both a rock wall and the road (97 N.).
    ? Smith Farmhouse Site - This was once the home site of Samuel, Samuel Jr., and the birth site of Asael Smith and Joseph Smith Sr. Though the original home is no longer standing, the Smith well still exists in the backyard of this home. To see the farm site after leaving the cemetery, make a right turn onto 97 N. Take the first left (at the fork) onto Ipswich. Go about one-half mile and turn left on North Street. Go one-tenth mile and turn left onto Boardman Street (stay on the right side of the forked road). Go to the end of the street and the home will be the last one on your left (Walker Road begins on your right). The home is privately owned and not available for tours.
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    ** Contributor: LDS Church - Combined in AF **
    Note: This person's information was combined while in Ancestral File. The following submitters of the information may or may not agree with the combining of the information: CARL HATCH/DECKER/ (2063787) ESTHER MARY/DECKER/ (2063788) GAYLE SKERRITT/KENNEDY/ (2064885) RICHARD MARTIN/ROGERS/ (2064997) MARY JEAN/FRODSHAM/ (2080126) SARAH MAY/MILLER/ (2086566) ALBERT A./SMITH/ (2106327) VERLA POWELL/TIMMERMAN/ (2118210) CARL LEROY/MCCOY/ (2119669) SARAH MELISSA/BIERY/ (2121233) ELAINE C./NICHOLS/ (2141217) GORDON LEE/CARLSON/ (2153938) REVA HANNAH/WEBSTER/ (2158252) F/WINZENRIED/ (2163789) MICHAEL A./KENNEDY/ (2165789) PAUL DARRELL/OWNBY/ (2172973) REVA E/BAIN/ (2177596) BRUCE N./CARPENTER/ (2177650) PHIL C./BURRELL/ (2177977) DAVID F./SMITH/ (2178601) SPECIAL LINEAGE/PROJECT/ (2178608) CLEONE SMITH/ISOM/ (2180544) WILMA IRIS/STIRNITZKE/ (2180738) TONI RICHARD/TURK/ (2180910) GLENN/JOHNSON/ (2181399) TAYE ENSIGN/WALDRON/ (2188311) IRENE/GLADE/ (2196362) DON ROY/DUNCAN/ (2199528) JOHN REES/CHRISTIANSEN/ (2205841) LILA/ROGERS/ (2207226) LAWRENCE LEE/CORRY/ (2207635) RICHARD AND SHARON/DUNCAN/ (2207666) MRS. CYNTHIA/PHILLIPS/ (2207902) LOLA/DANA/ (2210818) MARJORIE KERR/CICERCHI/ (2210497) KIRK GODDARD/LARSON/ (2210904) BOB & SARAH/SHUMWAY/ (2211044) BARBARA/FERGUSON/ (2213629) ALZINA SMITH/WHITE/ (2213793) J. COLLEEN/MASTERSON/ (2215980) WIGHTMAN FAMILY/ASSOC./ (2219942) DOROTHY ELIZABETH/BLANCHARD/ (2231414) OKIE/HEWARD (2232162) MARY F./SYPHUS (2240035) HEBER E./POULSON/ (2244891) ELDON/DUNN/ (2244955) THOMAS C./BOELLING/ (2250299) BEVERLY A./PICKETT/ (2252594) MARY LEE STOTT/CHRISTIANSEN (2255133) ROBERT WILLIAM/TURK/ (2257251) EUGENE W./WHITAKER/ (2264700) TRACIE DAHN/DUTKUS/ (2265761) LINDA ROWELL/HALLEN (2271231) HEATHER AYN/STUBBS/ (2279403) WILLIAM/MOUNTAIN/ (2280992) DONNA MACHACEK/TURK/ (2281009) DAVID J./HARRIS/ (2291961) MARGARET R./BROADBENT/ (2300038) GRACE AND CLAUDE E/LILYA (2304332) RICHARD L/SMITH/ (2306411) KENNETH B./SMITH (2331890) EILEEN MAY OATES/BARTANEN/ (2340256) GARY A./JENSEN/ (2347016) STEPHEN DOYLE/ROBISON/ (2347848) BRIAN J./BURGGRAAF/ (2352304) EMMA LOIS/SMITH/ (2352388) PATRICIA/ALLEN/ (2353048) ELIZABETH/HIGGS/ (2354115) CAMERON/BAXTER/ (2358482) ELSIE/STASKA/ (2363228) DELNA/POWELL/ (2374261) JON STUART/WAMMACK/ (2374641) KENNETH D./ROBERTS/ (2419520) ELIAS S./CASTLE/ (2466991) EARL HARVEY/PEIRCE/ (2630890)
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    ** Contributor: gcothran3062518 **
    Note: This program will not let me correct birth date of Asahel Smith. The family sheet shows 7 march 1743/44 this should be 1744
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    ** Contributor: tomboelling **
    Note: !BOOK: ANCESTRY & POSTERITY OF JOSEPH SMITH & EMMA HALE by Mary Audenter Smith Anderson
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    ** Contributor: tcboelling832447 **
    Note: !BOOK: ANCESTRY & POSTERITY OF JOSEPH SMITH & EMMA HALE by Mary Audenter Smith Anderson
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    ** Contributor: cporter90269 **
    Note: Submitted by Roy L. Birch, 9 Mar 2001, 6192, Agee St. #284, San Diego California 92122 USA submitted by Joey James Baldwin,7 Oct 2001,3824 S 300 E Salt Lake City Utah 84115 Submitted by Thomas Watson, 7 Jan 2000, Highway 49, P. O. Box 429, Ahwahnee, CA Submitted by Sandra Porter,6 Apr 2000,3844 E. Florian Ave.Mesa AZ 85206 Submitted by:Peter How Freeman, 29 aug 2001, 324 Bellevista drive Independence MO 64055 Joseph's Grandfather
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    ** Contributor: pporter2757219 **
    Note: Submitted by Roy L. Birch, 9 Mar 2001, 6192, Agee St. #284, San Diego California 92122 USA submitted by Joey James Baldwin,7 Oct 2001,3824 S 300 E Salt Lake City Utah 84115 Submitted by Thomas Watson, 7 Jan 2000, Highway 49, P. O. Box 429, Ahwahnee, CA Submitted by Sandra Porter,6 Apr 2000,3844 E. Florian Ave.Mesa AZ 85206 Submitted by:Peter How Freeman, 29 aug 2001, 324 Bellevista drive Independence MO 64055 Joseph's Grandfather
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    ** Contributor: djharris2731146 **
    Note: !Jesse N. Smith Record
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    ** Contributor: Brady Nixon **
    Note: From Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996.
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    ** Contributor: LolaDana1 **
    Note: Spelled also Asahel . Family record of Silas D. Smith. Mother's book,Arzella Gylling Mrytle Smith Blocker p. 47 Bk 1 .SL City.. Buckton nv known formally as Stockholm.
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    ** Contributor: JuliBulleigh1 **
    Note: ID: Joseph Smith Jr.'s line
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    ** Contributor: mbryson2716351 **
    Note: !Sources: B11 B21 Ancestros of Joseph Smith and Emma Hale p 65; Ut. Hist and Gen Mag Vol 20 p 14.
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    ** Contributor: l&mbryson1158307 **
    Note: !Sources: B11 B21 Ancestros of Joseph Smith and Emma Hale p 65; Ut. Hist and Gen Mag Vol 20 p 14.
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    ** Contributor: mpterry2734028 **
    Note: !NOTE: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (TM); ; June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998; ; , Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA. !NOTE: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (TM); ; June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998; ; , Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA.
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    ** Contributor: rharris2761031 **
    Note: !Jesse N. Smith Record
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    ** Contributor: djharris2731146 **
    Note: !Jesse N. Smith Record
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    ** Contributor: ltowne2741006 **
    Note: !From L.D.S. ancestral file.
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    ** Contributor: Eugene **
    Note: !AGI !Joseph Smith, Jr. Pedigree-Sharon Vt. Memorial
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    ** Contributor: etidwell2722139 **
    Note: !AGI !Joseph Smith, Jr. Pedigree-Sharon Vt. Memorial
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    ** Contributor: ltowne2741006 **
    Note: !From L.D.S. ancestral file.
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    ** Contributor: l&itowne2741007 **
    Note: !From L.D.S. ancestral file.
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    ** Contributor: Dr. Al Jensen **
    Note: Cooper,
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    ** Contributor: Dr. Al Jensen **
    Note: Cooper,
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    ** Contributor: klaw2749965 **
    Note: Asael Smith was the prophet Joseph Smith's Grandfather Some early records spelled his name Asahel, but he himself signed his name 'Asael'. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p.1278 ASAEL, the youngest child and second son of Samuel2, was born in Topsfield March 7, 1744; died October 31, 1830 in Stockholm, N. Y. He had eleven children and was the father of Joseph Smith the first Presiding Patriarch of the Church. He served in the American army during the Revolutionary war. He married Mary Duty. B. H. Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol.1, Ch.1, p.5 Asael Smith, second son of the above Samuel Smith (II), was born 7th of March, 1744. His early life was spent in Topsfield, and at twenty-three he married Mary Duty, of Windham, New Hampshire, in which place he lived for some time, thence moving successively to Dunbarton, and Manchester in the same state. During the American Revolution he served, though with less distinction than his father, in the American army. On the death of his father, Samuel Smith (II), Asael returned to the old homestead at Topsfield, which he had inherited. At Topsfield, Asael was made to feel the pressure of sectarian intolerance. It is evident that he had strong inclination himself toward that system of doctrine known as universalism--the belief that all souls will finally be saved, that good will finally triumph, universally and permanently. He was a man of strong convictions in religion, courageous, outspoken, but tolerant withal; and held to the view, not so popular then as it afterwards became, that men should be free to worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences. These views brought upon him the displeasure of the severely orthodox, who, at that time were swayed by the spirit that regarded toleration with the suspicion, so well expressed in the following quartrain: "Let men of God in courts and churches watch O'er such as do a Toleration hatch, Lest that ill egg bring forth a cockatrice To poison all in heresy and vice." This long had been the spirit dominant in New England, and therefore when Asael Smith made free to express his unorthodox opinions, and further emphasized these by giving shelter in his home to a despised and persecuted Quaker, it brought such displeasure of the community upon him that he resolved to leave Topsfield, the home of his fathers, and seek a more congenial society. He went first to northern New Hampshire, thence to Tunbridge, Vermont, where with the aid of his sons he cleared a large farm of virgin forest. In the later years of his life he made his home with his son Silas at Stockholm, St. Lawrence county, New York, where he died October 31st, 1830, in his eighty-sixth year. Smith, Asael (Male) Birth: Smith, Asael (Male) Date: March 7, 1744 Place: Topsfield, Essex, MA, USA Parents: Smith, Asael (Male) Father: Smith, Samuel Mother: Gould, Priscilla Death: Smith, Asael (Male) Date: October 31, 1830 Place: Stockholm, St. Lawrence, NY, USA Marriage Information: Smith, Asael (Male) Spouse: Duty, Mary Date: February 12, 1767 Place: Topsfield, Essex, MA, USA Children: Smith, Asael (Male) Name: Birthdate: Place: 1. Smith, Jesse April 20, 1768 Topsfield, Essex, MA, USA 2. Smith, Priscilla October 21, 1769Topsfield, Essex, MA, USA 3. Smith, Joseph July 12, 1771 Topsfield, Essex, MA, USA 4. Smith, Asahel May 21, 1773 Windham, Rockingham, NH, USA 5. Smith, Mary June 4, 1775 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 6. Smith, Samuel September 15, 1777 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 7. Smith, Silas October 1, 1779 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 8. Smith, John July 16, 1781Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 9. Smith, Susanna May 18, 1783 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 10. Smith, Stephen April 23, 1785 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA 11. Smith, Sarah May 16, 1789 Derryfield, Hillsborough, NH, USA Temple Ordinance Data: Smith, Asael (Male) Baptism Date: July 15, 1869 Endowment Date: June 27, 1879 Sealed to Parents Date: August 11, 1879 Sealed t o Parents Date: August 25, 1897 Archibald F. Bennett, Saviors on Mount Zion, p.88-89 Joseph Smith, Sr., was the son of Asael Smith, whose mother died when he was less than six months old. Five days after the Declaration of Independence was signed, he was enrolled in a patriot company which marched away to Canada. His father was also a Revolutionary soldier. He became a man of strong religious convictions, and his rugged pioneer life made his character stand out in bold relief. He held that all men in America should have free and equal religious liberty. For outspoken expression of such unorthodox tolerance, and for giving shelter to a despised Quaker, he drew upon himself and his family the condemnation of his neighbors. A gifted writer, his innate refinement, noble independence of mind, and child-like humility and trust in God are best shown in some words of guidance he addressed to his wife and children, which are still preserved and prized among his descendants. "My grandfather, Asael Smith," wrote the Prophet, "long ago predicted that there would be a prophet [p.89] raised up in his family, and my grandfather was fully satisfied that it was fulfilled in me. My grandfather Asael died?after having received the Book of Mormon, and read it nearly through; and he declared that I was the very Prophet that he had long known would come in his family." Both Asael Smith and his wife Mary Duty rejoiced in the restoration of the gospel before their departure from mortal life. Archibald F. Bennett, Saviors on Mount Zion, p.89 In "A True Copy of a Record Kept by Asael Smith," he gives this account of his own forefathers: "My father, Samuel Smith, Esqr. was born Jany. 26th 1714?My grandfather, Mr. Samuel Smith, was the son of Mr. Robert Smith who came from Old England." Of the emigrant from England, Robert Smith, it is written: Beginning life in the new world in a humble way, he gradually won the esteem of his neighbors, and through his industry and integrity was able to g ather around him some of the comforts of life?Robert was known among his neighbors as a quiet, unassuming man, devoted to the welfare of the settlement. His family was reared in the prevailing religious teachings of Puritan communities, and in a strict knowledge of the scriptures. From the days of Asael Smith to the year 1950 it was not possible to trace with certainty the parentage and ancestry of this Robert Smith. In 1659 he testified in court he was thirty-three years old. At a trial in Ipswich, Mass., in 1655, he testified that he came to New England as a boy apprentice, in the same ship with Mr. John Whittingham, from Boston in Lincolnshire, sailing in May, 1638, from London. This John Whittingham was baptized in Boston, England, 29 Sept. 1616, but his father was from Sutterton, about five miles south of Boston. Between Boston and Sutterton is the village of Kirton. Here the baptism record of Robert Smith has been found. From a microfilm copy of the Kirton parish registers the entry has been copied thus (translated from the Latin): Robert Smith, son of Robert, baptized the xxxth day of April 1626. A further search in the old and difficult handwriting of that early period revealed the baptisms of Robert's father and grandfather: Robt Smythe the Sonne of Edwarde was baptized the forth daye of this moneth, Marche 1595. (p. 105) Edward Smithe was baptized ye xxxth day of September 1571. Since no father is mentioned in this last entry, the parentage must now be sought for Edward Smith from other sources. Mormon Manuscripts to 1846: Guide to Lee Library, BYU SMITH, ASAEL (1744-1830). Papers. Including photocopy of typescript. 9 items. Born at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Samuel Smith, Jr., and Priscilla Gould. A biography includes: Family background and a list of descendants of Asael and Mary Duty Smith, the grandparents of the Prophet Joseph Smith; excerpt from John Smith's journal concerning a visit of Joseph Smith, Sr., to Asael Smith, informing him and others of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon; an account of Mary Duty Smith and her family moving to Kirtland, Ohio, and her death in 1836. Eight genealogical family group sheets on Asael Smith and other family members.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: Joyce Kelley1 **
    Note: SOURCE: Ancestral File version 4.19 12 November 2000
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    ** Contributor: dd&jakelley1133894 **
    Note: SOURCE: Ancestral File version 4.19 12 November 2000
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: alsanchez2792814 **
    Note: Source: RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project by Sanna Black at shannablack@hotmail.com. They had 11 children: 1768-1789 with Joseph, child #3 and Asael (Asahel) child #4.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: Joyce Kelley1 **
    Note: SOURCE: Ancestral File version 4.19 12 November 2000
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    ** Contributor: dd&jakelley1133894 **
    Note: SOURCE: Ancestral File version 4.19 12 November 2000
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: ljeppson2810985 **
    Note: Fought in the Revolutionary War enlisted under Captain John Nesmith in Colonel Joshua Wingate's regiment. In September 1779, he was elected townclerk of Derryfield. April 1786, he moved to Topsfield, Massachusetts. IN the spring of 1791, he moved to Tunbridge Vermont. In childhood he recieved a severe burn that left the chords of his neck stiff.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: Linda Rowell Hallen1 **
    Note: He and Mary are the parents of Joseph Smith, Sr., father of the Prophet
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    ** Contributor: mrcolj **
    Note: 1 _IFLAGS 0
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    ** Contributor: MichaelKennedy **
    Note: Known as "crooked-neck Smith"
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    ** Contributor: Lee Farnsworth **
    Note: also baptized 16 Dec 1939 ARIZO. also endowed 12 Jan 1940 ARIZO.also sealed
    spouse 2 Aug 1972

    also baptized 16 Dec 1939 ARIZO. also endowed 12 Jan 1940 ARIZO.also sealed
    spouse 2 Aug 1972
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Contributor: SmithTerryDean1 **
    Note: !SOURCE: A GedCom received from Robert & Sarah Shumway, P. O. Box 27,Vidalia, LA, 71373-0027; Phone: (318) 336-5502; E-Mail: rshumway@iamerica.netreceived via E-Mail 29 mar 1998.

    !BIRTH-DEATH-SPOUSE-MARRIAGE: Information was received via WorldConnect postem note Dated: Thu, 11 Jun 2009 03:30:58 -0600 Name: Jane Curci
    Email: Wmcurci@aol.com. Jane cites the following:
    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 693021 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said Zilpha Elizabeth Wimmer was the child of Peter I Wimmer born on 23 - Mar - 1842 at Columbus IL died at American Fork UT on 6 - Jan - 1930 and his ( 2nd ) wife Mary Amelia Smith born on 2 - Feb - 1852 at Parowan UT died at Ogden UT on 26 - Mar - 1915 married on 1 - Jun - 1865

    5.The Said Mary Amelia Smith was the child of George Albert Smith born on 26 - Jun - 1817 at Potsdam NY died at Salt Lake City UT on 1 - Sep - 1875 and his ( 4st ) wife Zilpha Stark born on 3 - Jul - 1818 at Hartland NY died at Parowan UT on 19 - Sep - 1878 married on 26 - Mar - 1845

    6.The Said George Albert Smith was the child of John Smith born on 16 - Jul - 1781 at Derryfield Rockingham Co NH died at Salt Lake City UT on 22 - May - 1854 and his ( 1st ) wife Clarissa Lyman born on 27 - Jun - 1790 at Lebanon CT died at Salt Lake City UT on 14 - Feb - 1854 married on 11 - Sep - 1815

    7.The Said John Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 1 - Mar - 1744 at Topsfield MA died at East Stockton NY on 30 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 11 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley MA died at Kirtland OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1767

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL

    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 756027 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said David Smith Rowley was the child of John Thompson Rowley born on 7 - Nov - 1847 at Glasgow Scotland died at Spring Glen Carbon Co UT on 31 - Jan - 1925 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Jane Smith born on 17 - Jun - 1852 at Provo Utah Co UT died at Spring Glen Carbon Co UT on 5 - Jan - 1917 married on 22 - Jun - 1880

    5.The Said Mary Jane Smith was the child of Silas Smith born on 6 - Jun - 1822 at Stockholm St Lawrence Co NY died at Meadow Millard Co UT on 11 - Jun - 1892 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Orton born on 1 - Jun - 1826 at Lebanon Clinton Co IL died at Meadow Millard Co UT on 27 - Nov - 1902 married on (a) - - 1844

    6.The Said Silas Smith was the child of Asahel Smith born on 21 - May - 1773 at Windham Rockingham Co NH died at Selma Wapello Co IA on 21 - Jul - 1848 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Schellenger born on 1 - Dec - 1785 at Chatham Hartford Co CT died at Selma Wapello Co IA on 14 - Oct - 1846 married on 21 - Mar - 1802

    7.The Said Asahel Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 7 - Mar - 1743/44 at Topsfield Essex Co MA died at Stockholm St Lawrence Co NY on 30 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 11 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley Essex Co MA died at Kirtland Geauga Co OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1767

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL WINGATE

    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 779801 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said Mary Lovinea McDonald was the child of Frank McDonald born on 22 - Jun - 1893 at Mount Pleasant IA died at Phoenix AZ on 4 - May - 1953 and his ( 1st ) wife Winsome Lavinia Smith born on 20 - Aug - 1896 at Lamoni IA died at Independence MO on 30 - Nov - 1986 married on 27 - Jan - 1917

    5.The Said Winsome Lavinia Smith was the child of Frederick Alexander Smith born on 19 - Jan - 1862 at Sonora Twp Hancock Co IL died at Independence MO on 23 - Jun - 1954 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Angelina Walker born on 18 - Mar - 1867 at Denver CO died at Independence MO on 3 - Dec - 1931 married on 16 - Nov - 1884

    6.The Said Frederick Alexander Smith was the child of Alexander Hale Smith born on 2 - Jun - 1838 at Nauvoo IL died at Nauvoo IL on 12 - Aug - 1909 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Agnes Kendall born on 16 - Jun - 1845 at Marysport England died at Lamoni IA on 7 - May - 1919 married on 23 - Jun - 1861

    7.The Said Alexander Hale Smith was the child of Joseph Smith Jrborn on 23 - Dec - 1805 at Sharon Windsor Co VT died at Carthage Hancock Co IL on 27 - Jun
    ========================================
    Name
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    ** Contributor: unknown4470317 **
    Note: Direct Descendant
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    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Name is generated
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    ** Contributor: unknown4470317 **
    Note: Family Representative is a direct descendant of this child.
    ========================================
    Gender
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    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Gender is generated
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    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Gender is generated
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    Birth
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    Date: 7 Mar 1744
    Place: Manchester, H, NH
    - - - - -
    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Location is generated
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    Date: 1755
    Place: Derryfield,, New Hampshire
    - - - - -
    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Date and Location are generated
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    Date: 7 Mar 1744
    Place: East Stockholm, St Lawrence, New York
    - - - - -
    ** Contributor: Family and Church History **
    Note: Location is generated
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    7.The Said John Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 1 - Mar - 1744 at Topsfield MA died at East Stockton NY on 30 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 11 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley MA died at Kirtland OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1767

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL

    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 756027 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said David Smith Rowley was the child of John Thompson Rowley born on 7 - Nov - 1847 at Glasgow Scotland died at Spring Glen Carbon Co UT on 31 - Jan - 1925 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Jane Smith born on 17 - Jun - 1852 at Provo Utah Co UT died at Spring Glen Carbon Co UT on 5 - Jan - 1917 married on 22 - Jun - 1880

    5.The Said Mary Jane Smith was the child of Silas Smith born on 6 - Jun - 1822 at Stockholm St Lawrence Co NY died at Meadow Millard Co UT on 11 - Jun - 1892 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Orton born on 1 - Jun - 1826 at Lebanon Clinton Co IL died at Meadow Millard Co UT on 27 - Nov - 1902 married on (a) - - 1844

    6.The Said Silas Smith was the child of Asahel Smith born on 21 - May - 1773 at Windham Rockingham Co NH died at Selma Wapello Co IA on 21 - Jul - 1848 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Schellenger born on 1 - Dec - 1785 at Chatham Hartford Co CT died at Selma Wapello Co IA on 14 - Oct - 1846 married on 21 - Mar - 1802

    7.The Said Asahel Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 7 - Mar - 1743/44 at Topsfield Essex Co MA died at Stockholm St Lawrence Co NY on 30 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 11 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley Essex Co MA died at Kirtland Geauga Co OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1767

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL WINGATE

    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 779801 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said Mary Lovinea McDonald was the child of Frank McDonald born on 22 - Jun - 1893 at Mount Pleasant IA died at Phoenix AZ on 4 - May - 1953 and his ( 1st ) wife Winsome Lavinia Smith born on 20 - Aug - 1896 at Lamoni IA died at Independence MO on 30 - Nov - 1986 married on 27 - Jan - 1917

    5.The Said Winsome Lavinia Smith was the child of Frederick Alexander Smith born on 19 - Jan - 1862 at Sonora Twp Hancock Co IL died at Independence MO on 23 - Jun - 1954 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Angelina Walker born on 18 - Mar - 1867 at Denver CO died at Independence MO on 3 - Dec - 1931 married on 16 - Nov - 1884

    6.The Said Frederick Alexander Smith was the child of Alexander Hale Smith born on 2 - Jun - 1838 at Nauvoo IL died at Nauvoo IL on 12 - Aug - 1909 and his ( 1st ) wife Elizabeth Agnes Kendall born on 16 - Jun - 1845 at Marysport England died at Lamoni IA on 7 - May - 1919 married on 23 - Jun - 1861

    7.The Said Alexander Hale Smith was the child of Joseph Smith Jrborn on 23 - Dec - 1805 at Sharon Windsor Co VT died at Carthage Hancock Co IL on 27 - Jun - 1844 and his ( 1st ) wife Emma Hale born on 10 - Jul - 1804 at Harmony Susquehanna Co PA died at Nauvoo IL on 30 - Apr - 1879 married on 18 - Jan - 1827

    8.The Said Joseph Smith was the child of Joseph Smith Srborn on 12 - Jul - 1771 at Topsfield MA died at Commerce Hancock Co IL on 14 - Sep - 1840 and his ( 1st ) wife Lucy Mack born on 8 - Jul - 1776 at Gilsom NH died at Nauvoo IL on 8 - May - 1855 married on 24 - Jan - 1796

    9.The Said Joseph Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 7 - Mar - 1744 at Topsfield Essex Co MA died at Stockholm St Lawrence Co NY on 30 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 16 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley MA died at Kirtland OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1760

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL WINGATE

    Descendants List
    Member: -- Name Restricted -- Nat'l #: 656352 Ancestor #: A104688
    1.-- Generation Restricted --
    2.-- Generation Restricted --
    3.-- Generation Restricted --
    4.The Said Eli Thomas Peirce was the child of William Peirce born on 2 - Apr - 1833 at Brandywine PA died at Harper Ward on 7 - Feb - 1908 and his ( 1st ) wife Jerusha Smith born on 13 - Jan - 1836 at Kirtland OH died at Harper Ward UT on 26 - Jun - 1912 married on 28 - Dec - 1854

    5.The Said Jerusha Smith was the child of Hyrum Smith born on 9 - Feb - 1800 at Turnbridge VT died at Carthage IL on 27 - Jun - 1844 and his ( 1st ) wife Jerusha Barden born on 15 - Feb - 1805 at Norfolk CT died at Kirtland OH on 13 - Oct - 1837 married on 2 - Nov - 1826

    6.The Said Hyrum Smith was the child of Joseph Smith Srborn on 12 - Jul - 1771 at Topsfield MA died at Nauvoo IL on 14 - Sep - 1840 and his ( 1st ) wife Lucy Mack born on 8 - Jul - 1775 at Gilsum NH died at Nauvoo IL on 8 - May - 1855 married on 24 - Jan - 1796

    7.The Said Joseph Smith was the child of Asael Smith born on 7 - Mar - 1744 at Topsfield MA died at East Stockholm NY on 31 - Oct - 1830 and his ( 1st ) wife Mary Duty born on 11 - Oct - 1743 at Rowley MA died at Kirtland OH on 27 - May - 1836 married on 12 - Feb - 1767

    Associated Ancestor (Revolutionary) RecordSMITH, ASAEL Ancestor #: A104688 Service: NEW HAMPSHIRE Rank: PRIVATE Birth: 7 Mar 1743 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 30 Oct 1830 EAST STOCKHOLM ST LAWRENCE CO NEW YORK Service Description: 1) CAPT NESMITH, COL WINGATE
  • Change Date: 28 OCT 2013 at 09:00:13 1



    Father: Samuel SMITH b: 26 JAN 1714 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts c: APR 1724 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
    Mother: Priscilla GOULD b: 4 AUG 1707 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts

    Marriage 1 Mary DUTY b: 11 OCT 1743 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts c: 16 OCT 1743 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts
    • Married: 12 FEB 1767 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
    Children
    1. Has No Children Jesse SMITH b: 20 APR 1768 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts c: 20 APR 1768 in Topsfield, Essex Co, Massachusetts
    2. Has No Children Priscilla SMITH b: 21 OCT 1769 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts c: 21 OCT 1769 in Topsfield, Essex Co, Massachusetts
    3. Has Children Joseph SMITH b: 12 JUL 1771 in Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts
    4. Has Children Asahel SMITH b: 21 MAY 1773 in Windham, Rockingham, New Hampshire
    5. Has No Children Mary SMITH b: 4 JUN 1775 in Windham, Rockingham, New Hampshire
    6. Has No Children Samuel SMITH b: 15 SEP 1777 in Windham, Rockingham, New Hampshire
    7. Has Children Silas SMITH b: 1 OCT 1779 in Manchester, Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    8. Has Children John SMITH b: 16 JUL 1781 in Derryfield, Rockingham, New Hampshire c: in Derryfield, Rockingham, New Hampshire, U.S.A.
    9. Has No Children Susanna SMITH b: 18 MAY 1783 in Derryfield, Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    10. Has No Children Stephen SMITH b: 23 APR 1785 in Derryfield, Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    11. Has No Children Sarah SMITH b: 16 MAY 1789 in Derryfield, Hillsboro, New Hampshire

    Sources:
    1. Title: Terry D. Smith
      Note: 1978 Miner Way, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 89104-5214, tdsfamgen100@gmail.com, Please Send Emails or use Postem Notes, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igmuser.cgi. This update as of 21 Jun 2014. As a work in progress your comments, suggestions, corrections and data are appreciated. Please use Postem- notes to forward your ideas. PLEASE include your sources! The Postems come to me. Listen to the Whisperings, they can lead you to lost family members! If you do not wish to be identified as the source of rinformation, please supply WHERE you acquired the information. Remember too that I do not update the web except every 3 months or so. My sight is worsening so updates may take longer. If you do not want your name and email posted as a contact, please do not contact me.

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